2016 Annual Drinking Water Quality Report

Town of Elizabethtown

2016 Annual Drinking Water Quality Report

 

PWSID # 03-09-010                                                           MARCH, 2016

 

The Town is pleased to present to you this year's Annual Drinking Water Quality Report.  This report is designed to inform citizens about the water quality and services the Town delivers every day.  The Town’s constant goal is to provide citizens with a safe and dependable supply of drinking water.  The Town’s water source is ground water and the wells draw from the Upper Cape Fear and Black Creek Aquifers.

At the date of this report, the Town’s drinking water is safe and meets federal and state requirements.

For any questions about this report, please contact Public Services at 910-862-2035.  Citizens may also learn more by attending any regularly scheduled meetings held in Town Council Chambers on the first Monday of each month at 7:00 p.m.

Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants.  The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk.  More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the Environmental Protection Agency’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791).

Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population.  Immune-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections.  These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers.  EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791).

As water travels over land or underground, it can pick up substances or contaminants such as microbes, inorganic and organic chemicals, and radioactive substances.  All drinking water, including bottled drinking water, may be reasonably expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants.  It is important to remember that the presence of these contaminants does not necessarily pose a health risk.

The water used by the Town is pumped from the ground at five locations.

The North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources, Public Water Supply Section, Source Water Assessment Program (SWAP) conducted assessments for all drinking water sources across North Carolina.  The purposes of the assessments were to determine susceptibility of each drinking water source to Potential Contaminant Sources (PCSs).  Results of the assessment are available in SWAP Assessment Reports.

The relative susceptibility of each source for the Town of Elizabethtown was determined by combining the contaminant rating and inherent vulnerability rating.  The assessment findings are summarized in the table below:

 

Susceptibility of Sources to PCS

 

Source Name

Susceptibility Rating

SWAP Report

Date

Well #1

Moderate

7/2015

Well #2

Higher

7/2015

Well #3A

Lower

7/2015

Well #4

Lower

7/2015

Well # 5

Lower

7/2015

 

The complete SWAP Assessment report for the Town of Elizabethtown is located on the Web at: http://www.ncwater.org/pws/swap.  To obtain a printed copy of this report, please mail request to Source Water Assessment Program – Report Request, 1634 Mail Service Center Raleigh, NC 27699-1634.  If you have, any questions about the SWAP report contact the Source Water Assessment staff by phone at 919-715-2633.

It is important to understand that a susceptibility rating of higher does not imply poor water quality.  Susceptibility is an indicator only of the systems’ potential to become contaminated by PCS’s in the assessment area.

The Town routinely monitors for over 150 contaminants in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws.  The following tables list all the drinking water contaminants detected in the last round of sampling for the particular contaminate group.  The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate the water poses a health risk.  Unless otherwise noted, data presented in the tables is from testing done January 1 to December 31,2014The EPA or State requires the Town to monitor for certain contaminants less than once per year because the concentrations of these contaminants are not expected to vary significantly from year to year.  Some of the data, though representative of the water quality, is more than one year old.

 

In this table, you will find many terms and abbreviations used in required monitoring.  We have listed the terms and definitions are provided as follows:

 

Non-Detects (ND) - laboratory analysis indicates that the constituent is not present.

Not-Applicable (N/A)– Information not applicable/not required for that particular water system or for that particular rule.

Parts per million (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/l) - one part per million corresponds to one minute in two years or a single penny in $10,000.

Parts per billion (ppb) or Micrograms per liter(ug/L) - one part per billion corresponds to one minute in 2,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000.

Action Level - the concentration of a contaminant that, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements, which a water system must follow.

Maximum Contaminant Level - The “Maximum Allowed” (MCL) is the highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water.  MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology.

Maximum Contaminant Level Goal - The “Goal” (MCLG) is the level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health.  MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.

Extra Note: MCL’s are set at very stringent levels.  To understand the possible health effects described for many regulated constituents, a person would have to drink 2 liters of water every day at the MC Level for a lifetime to have a one-in-a-million chance of having the described health effect. 

 

THE TOWN OF ELIZABETHTOWN’S COMPLIANCE DATA

 

Elizabethtown – Regulated Contaminants

Contaminant (units)

Sample

Date

MCL

Violation

Y/N

Your

Water

Range

Low-High

MCLG

MCL

Likely Source of Contamination

Copper (mg/l)

(90th percentile)

2014

N

0.130

0.055- 0.233

 

0 samples were Found Above the Action Level

1.3

AL = 1.3

Corrosion of household plumbing systems; erosion of natural deposits; leaching from wood preservatives

Lead (mg/l)

(90th percentile)

2014

N

ND

0 samples were Found Above the Action Level

0

AL = 15

Corrosion of household plumbing systems; erosion of natural deposits.

Fluoride

2014

N

0.256

0.13 – 0.36

4

4

Erosion of natural deposits.

 

If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children.  Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing.  The Town ofElizabethtown Water Department is responsible for providing high quality drinking water, but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components.  When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking.  If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested.  Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead.

 

Elizabethtown – Disinfection and Byproducts Containments

Contaminant (units)

Sample

Date

MCL/MRDL

Violation

Y/N

Your

Water

RAA

(Stage II)

Range

Low-High

MCLG

MCL

Likely Source of Contamination

STAGE II_TTHM (ppb)

(Total Trihalomethanes)

2016

N

16.73

1.7-40.8

N/A

80

Disinfection Byproduct

By-product of drinking water chlorination

STAGE II_ HAA5 (ppb)

(Total Haloacetic Acids

2016

N

6.73

2.4-11.5

N/A

60

Disinfection Byproduct

By-product of drinking water chlorination

Chlorine (ppm)

2016

N

0.98

0.40 – 1.90

MRDLG

 

4

MRDLG

    

          4

Water additive used to control microbes

 

Elizabethtown – Other Miscellaneous Water Characteristics Contaminants

Contaminant (units)

Sample

Date

Your

Water

Range

Low-High

SMCL

Iron (ppm)

2014

0.134

0.134

0.3

Sodium (ppm)

2014

36.7

6.7 – 84.2

N/A

pH (units)

2014

7.3

7.0 – 7.6

6.5 – 8.5

Sulfate (ppm)

2014

16.3

16.3

250

 

The PWSS requires monitoring for other misc. contaminants, some for which the EPA has set national secondary drinking water standards (SMCLs) because they may cause cosmetic effects or aesthetic effects (such as taste, odor, and/or color) in drinking water.  The contaminants with SMCLs normally do not have any health effects and normally do not affect the safety of your water.

 

Collection System 2016

The Town of Elizabethtown’s wastewater collection system consists of approximately 263,000 linear feet of gravity sewer pipe.  The Town also owns and maintains 15 pumping stations or lift stations.  The pump stations are equipped with automated controls, audible and visual alarms. Most have standby power and the rest have power receptacles for portable generators.  Over half of the pump stations are connected to SCADA, a system that provides continuous monitoring.  These pump stations operate twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year.  The Town continues to upgrade the SCADA System on Water and Wastewater infrastructure.  Several Lift Stations have also been updated or added to SCADA. The remaining Lift Stations have been introduced into the budget process to be equipped for SCADA. 

The Town’s Collections system operates under State permit # WQCS00154.

SSO’s (Sanitary Sewer Overflows) occur when a problem in the system causes sewage to come out of manhole covers, service clean-outs, or plumbing fixtures.  Every day, millions of gallons of wastewater begin the journey from homes and businesses, through kitchen sinks, bathtubs, toilets, and washing machines, to the collections system, and, ultimately, the Wastewater Treatment Plant.

The Town had 1 reportable SSO this past year. The Town strives to have zero spills from the collection system.  However, because pump stations are mechanical devices and sewer lines are subject to unavoidable clogs from grease, roots, so-called flushable wipes, construction debris, etc., all systems are subject to spills.  In trying to prevent any blockages or the buildup of debris that may cause blockages in the collection system, staff uses video equipment for inspection and incorporates routine flushing for preventive maintenance.

In addition, the Town has a rapid response program with 24-hour on-call personnel to help mitigate spills.  The Town also owns a high-pressure sewer flusher machine that is used extensively in the maintenance of the collection system.  Town staff inspects and cleans at least 10% of the sewer lines each year.  During the past year, flushing by Town staff cleaned over 26,712 linear feet of sewer lines.

 

Grease Control

Did you know that each year there are more than 15,000 sewer overflows in North Carolina?  Many of these overflows are directly related to improper disposal of oil and grease in kitchen drains.  Grease congeals in sewer pipes, which causes wastewater to flow back into homes and businesses or directly into waterway.

Wastewater collection lines are designed to handle three things; used water, human waste and toilet paper.  It is very important to keep all foreign materials, such as grease and other household items, non-flushable products and debris from entering the sewer system.

The Town’s oil and grease programs are designed to limit illegal discharges of fats, oils and grease from homes and businesses into the wastewater collection system.  Small amounts of grease entering the collection system can accumulate over time causing blockages, which can harm the environment and cost thousands of dollars to clean up.  The Town works continuously to both maintain the sewer system infrastructure and protect the environment.

 

You can help, too! Please participate by:

  • Please put used oils and cooking grease in collections containers for proper disposal.

 

  • Remove oil and grease from kitchen utensils with scraper’s or paper towels, so that it doesn’t drain into the municipal sewere

 

  • Place food scraps in trash containers.

 

All of us can work together to achieve our goals: providing you with reliable service and protecting the environment.

 
The Town of Elizabethtown, NC - 1773